Tag Archives: development

Repeat after me: Chrome is the platform, Android (and iOS) is just the host

I’ve been saying for some time that Google’s longer-term plans for application development all hinged around Chrome. Native Android apps are silos: although Google has built tools which allow developers to make Android apps searchable (and thus a target for ad sales, and tracking) it’s much harder than with a native HTML web app. 

Building an app using native tools is also a dead-end: developers have to work harder to create a web-native equivalent. And web-native equivalents can be easily supported by advertising, supplied by… you guessed it… Google. 

Chrome Packaged Apps, on the other hand, are “native” web apps – and the web is Google’s true focus. So it’s no surprise that Google has released an early release which lets you bring Packaged Apps to iOS and Android. 

Chome is the development platform, not Android: Android is just the host, just like iOS is. 

Apple’s quest for massive market share

John Gruber has an excellent post up on Apple’s apparent-restriction of cross-platform development tools on the iPhone. I largely agree with him – from Apple’s perspective this makes perfect sense, although it puts a massive spanner in the works for magazine publisers, who love Flash like a brother.

But there’s one point that I disagree with John on, and it’s this:

“I don’t think Apple even dreams of a Windows-like share of the mobile market. Microsoft’s mantra was and remains ‘Windows everywhere’. Apple doesn’t want everywhere, they just want everywhere good.”

I think this is wrong: I’m certain that Apple would love, and intends to get, a massive market share for the iPhone.

Why? Because it has already tasted the fruits of massive, dominant market share with the iPod – and it’s seen exactly how much that can do for a company’s fortunes.

Why wouldn’t it want to repeat the trick with the iPhone? The phone, after all, is as ubiquitous as personal music players. And the margins, at least at the moment, are better. If you think Apple is profitable now, imagine how profitable it would be if it sold 60% of every phone in the world.