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Welcome to the new, Radio-run

Welcome to the new, Radio-run Technovia. You won’t notice much different, except the ripped-off Movable Type look and a few other bits and pieces. The address for the RSS feed has changed, too, so you’ll need to point your RSS readers somewhere else. Quite where, I need to look up.

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I’ve been trying to get

I’ve been trying to get the remote feature of Radio to work, so that I can offload the processing strain from my iBook to the (pretty much unused) PC. At present, I can’t do it – although I suspect that it’s more to do with my firewall setup than with Radio. We’ll see later.

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Ladies and gentlemen, Mr Danny

Ladies and gentlemen, Mr Danny O’Brien.

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WebGraphics points out that there’s

WebGraphics points out that there’s a beta release of Plone for OS X. It even come with a standard installer, making the content management system easier to use. [webgraphics]

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Wired ran a piece from

Wired ran a piece from Mitch Kapor, on “Ten things I hate about Outlook”. Kapor, as you may know, is currently working on a project called Chandler, which is designed to be a much more freeform and interesting (and useful) organiser than Microsoft’s product. There’s one problem: Mitch specifically asked Wired not to angle his Ten things as an anti-Outlook piece.

This is one of the reasons why print media could be in trouble. All too often, journalists (and I speak as one) have such a fixed idea of the angle that they want to pursue that they will do so, even at the expense of the facts. In the context of a print magazine, this makes a twisted kind of sense: part of the point of print is that the editorial control over it is tight, you are in a sense using your editorial skills to shape the news agenda. A good editor shapes it in such a way as to make the whole more coherent, without undermining the facts.

But that doesn’t mean doing what Wired did, which is to get the angle no matter what. In olden days, journalists could actually get away with this – the feedback loop was closed. However, now, blogging tools mean that not only will you get caught out – millions of people will read all about it, perhaps more people than read the original article. Wired should have known better. [Mitch Kapor's Weblog]

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Many moons ago, during the

Many moons ago, during the height of the Warchalking thing, Tom Coates suggested a mischievous twist on this: Whorechalking. Months later, this gets picked up by Time Out, and Time Out doesn’t actually get the joke. As Tom says “print media is so dead it’s not even funny. [plasticbag.org]

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Some game is now free

Some game is now free to .Mac members. I’m not sure this is the way to go for Apple – yes it’s nice to get little tidbits for free, but I’d rather have a few more useful services. [dotmac.info -- THE Source for All Things .Mac!]

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This site has lots and

This site has lots and lots of Radio related resources on it.

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Darwinists don their Finking caps.

Darwinists don their Finking caps. After breaking spectacularly with the release of Mac OS X 10.2, Fink is now back on course and working happily. If you’re not familiar with Fink, it’s a version of the BSD package management system that allows you to download and install lots of lovely Unix tools. [The Register]

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Slashdot is reporting that Mad

Slashdot is reporting that Mad Max has signed up for a new Mac Max film – for a cool $25 million. If this turns out to be true, it’s going to be interesting – the second Mad Max film was almost the greatest post-apocalytic film. [Slashdot]

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