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Azeem has a flat for

Azeem has a flat for rent here. If anyone needs a nice place to live in London, it’s worth looking at. This has been a public service announcement.

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RadioExpress is a nicely written

RadioExpress is a nicely written bookmarklet that performs the same function for Radio that the BlogThis bookmarklet does for Blogger. However, most of the links to it are broken, as Mike Krus (its author) moved from Radio to Movable Type. For anyone who needs it, it now lives here.

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Argh! Nigel Slater is on

Argh! Nigel Slater is on UK Food cooking the perfect chip. Which means I have to go now and get myself a cholestrol-laden, evil chip buttie.

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Digital records ‘obscure the past’.

Digital records ‘obscure the past’. BBC News has an excellent story on the problems of digital archiving. Well worth reading, as it raises some fundamental questions. On the surface, digitization would seem to imply that data has more longevity – for example, an ASCII version of a book will be copied in so many places that it has a much better chance of surviving.

However, the problem is that ASCII is about the only lingua franca of computers, and it’s a poor, low-bandwidth way of storing information. Richer formats have a habit of either being proprietary (PDF), which might give them a more limited life than open ones. And don’t even start thinking about the problems of physical media…[BBC News | Technology | UK Edition]

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PC Mag: Damning the iBook

PC Mag: Damning the iBook with Faint Praise. Insanely Great has a critique of PC Mag’s review of the low-end iBook. Although often these kind of pieces are actually pretty stupid (concentrating on how the review just doesn’t understand the Mac), here Remy Davidson does an excellent job of taking what is a pretty poor review apart, piece by factual piece. [Insanely Great Mac]

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Welcome to the new, Radio-run

Welcome to the new, Radio-run Technovia. You won’t notice much different, except the ripped-off Movable Type look and a few other bits and pieces. The address for the RSS feed has changed, too, so you’ll need to point your RSS readers somewhere else. Quite where, I need to look up.

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I’ve been trying to get

I’ve been trying to get the remote feature of Radio to work, so that I can offload the processing strain from my iBook to the (pretty much unused) PC. At present, I can’t do it – although I suspect that it’s more to do with my firewall setup than with Radio. We’ll see later.

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Ladies and gentlemen, Mr Danny

Ladies and gentlemen, Mr Danny O’Brien.

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WebGraphics points out that there’s

WebGraphics points out that there’s a beta release of Plone for OS X. It even come with a standard installer, making the content management system easier to use. [webgraphics]

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Wired ran a piece from

Wired ran a piece from Mitch Kapor, on “Ten things I hate about Outlook”. Kapor, as you may know, is currently working on a project called Chandler, which is designed to be a much more freeform and interesting (and useful) organiser than Microsoft’s product. There’s one problem: Mitch specifically asked Wired not to angle his Ten things as an anti-Outlook piece.

This is one of the reasons why print media could be in trouble. All too often, journalists (and I speak as one) have such a fixed idea of the angle that they want to pursue that they will do so, even at the expense of the facts. In the context of a print magazine, this makes a twisted kind of sense: part of the point of print is that the editorial control over it is tight, you are in a sense using your editorial skills to shape the news agenda. A good editor shapes it in such a way as to make the whole more coherent, without undermining the facts.

But that doesn’t mean doing what Wired did, which is to get the angle no matter what. In olden days, journalists could actually get away with this – the feedback loop was closed. However, now, blogging tools mean that not only will you get caught out – millions of people will read all about it, perhaps more people than read the original article. Wired should have known better. [Mitch Kapor’s Weblog]

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