Apple ranks joint-first for environmentally-friendly tech

Given that I’ve written extensively before on Apple’s environmental record, this is worth noting: Greenpeace has ranked Apple as joint-top tech company (with Nokia) for its efforts to reduce use of known pollutants in its products.

This represents a major effort from the industrial design team and from everyone at Apple. Given that it’s managed to do this while increasing its margins, it’s also a fine example to the rest of the business community that being conscious about the impact of your products on the environment and doing something about it doesn’t have to mean cutting into your profits.

  • http://www.bill-mcminn.com/techhelp/geeksgogreen.html Bill McMinn

    One of Apple’s environmental sins that they have yet to repent for is their non interchangeable batteries on iPods, iPhones and some newer MacBooks. Make these devices so that the batteries can be changed by the user when they can no longer hold a charge.

  • Ian Betteridge

    Bill, there’s actually an argument to be made that these batteries are greener than replaceable ones.

    In order to replace the battery on a MacBook Pro, for example, I have to go in to Apple and have it replaced (same price as buying an older, removable model).

    Apple will then dispose of this battery properly. If, on the other hand, I was able to replace the battery myself there would be no guarantee that the battery was disposed of correctly – it could easily simply end up in landfill.